OSWE Exam review “2020” + Notes & Gifts inside!

edited February 3 in Off-topic

A couple of months after I earned my OSCP, I knew that my next step was going to be OSWE.

For the past 6 moths or so I’ve been busy preparing for the Offensive Security Web Expert (OSWE) certificate. I’ve had this certification on my plan, and once it was announced for the public in 2019, I started preparing to enroll in its course. I couple of months ago I registered for the OSWE course "Advnaced Web Attacks and Exploitation - AWAE". Last week, I had my 48-hour OSWE exam, and this morning I was informed that I successfully passed the exam and earned OSWE.

During my preparation period, and when I was preparing for the exam, I found that there’re no proper reviews for OSWE, since it is a relatively new certificate “2019”, and I found myself needing answers for several questions. So, I’ve decided to share with you a detailed OSWE review, for anyone who’s interested or planning to take OSWE.



Who it’s for "vs OSCP"

The very first thing that must be clearly understood, OSWE is not a successor to OSCP, nor is OSCE, but they are rather advanced courses in one of its fields.

OSCP is designed as an pentester certification, and hence it covers all of the main fields of pentesting, like Recon, Privilege Escalation, Network pivoting, Binary Exploitation, and Web Exploitation, at a professional level.
You can find my OSCP review here:

OSCP Exam review ''2019'' + Notes & Gift inside!

To be an “expert” in pentesting, there’s no one certificate that will cover expert level testing in all of the above fields, as the course would be 500 hours long, and the exam would 2 weeks long!

This is why for the “expert” level, there’s a separate certification in each field. For Advanced Binary/OS Exploitation there’re GXPN/OSCE/OSEE, for Advanced Web Exploitation there’s OSWE, and so on.

So, the question is, who is this certification for? Who should consider taking it?

In my humble opinion, as its name suggest, OSWE is for anyone looking to be an expert in web exploitation, where OSCP skills would just not be enough.

Such cases are when you are doing pentesting for critical web applications, like online banking platforms or globally used web apps, and you need to perform advanced pentesting at the source code level. OSWE might also be very appealing to people interested in bug bounty hunting, given that the majority of bug bounties are focused on web applications.

As for people who are purely doing blackbox pentesting, OSWE might not be very useful for them, since it is purely designed around whitebox testing. You might not find the benefits directly improving your work, as if you’re only doing blackbox testing, you may not be able to apply most of the things you learned at AWAE.

Still, I don’t want to discourage anyone thinking about OSWE from taking it. I think AWAE would still be a great learning experience, and you will definitely learn a lot of new stuff. Just make sure that you are spending your money and time on something that will benefit your work.

In general, AWAE is an advanced course, and OSWE is an "expert" level certificate. If you compare it to HTB boxes, it will definitely be around Hard/Insane difficulty, while PWK/OSCP would probably be around Easy/Medium difficulty.



Preparation & Practice Material

I always prefer to register only when I feel fully prepared to be certified, rather than going for the course and learning it's modules from scratch in its labs, since this might take much more lab time.

As mentioned earlier, when I wanted to start preparing for OSWE, I had no idea what topics I should learn, for the lack of review material. In the end, I set a plan for myself to follow before registering for AWAE, based on the course syllabus published by OffSec, which you can find here:
https://www.offensive-security.com/documentation/awae-syllabus.pdf

The following are the courses I took in web development to prepare for AWAE:

  • NodeJS web app development
  • C# .Net MVC web app development
  • Java web app development

I did not go very deep in each, and simply learned what is necessary to understand how to read the code, undestand how url routing works in each language, and be able to understand the functionality of the web app.

You might also consider the following:

  • Python exploit development
  • PHP web app development
  • SQL scripting
  • JavaScript development
  • JavaScript for Pentesters "Pentester Academy"
  • WAP challenges "Pentester Academy"



My Gift to HTB members

My previous gift to HTB members, in my OSCP review, was the nmapAutomator tool, which I was glad to see well received, and got over 10k downloads from GitHub. You can find it here:
https://github.com/21y4d/nmapAutomator

While nmapAutomator took me a couple of weeks to finish, this one took me a couple of months of daily work, and a lot more lines of code, in many different languages!

Once I finished the above plan, I wanted to test my capabilities in whitebox testing before enrolling to the AWAE course. So, I looked through HTB for boxes with whitebox pentesting attack vectors, but didn’t find any!

At that time, I had owned almost all active and retired HTB boxes “except for perhaps 5”, and in almost none of them did I find whitebox attack paths. Even in the ones that did provide the source code, they were either very basic and can be done without the source code, or simply did not focus on whitebox pentesting.

So, I had the great idea of creating an HTB box that is completely focused on whitebox testing, and so I made sourceCode!

I wanted to make it a really enjoyable box with a great learning experience, and worked at every detail, which I hope will show in the final result.



sourceCode.htb

In summary, sourceCode requires you to be able to exploit scripts written in 6 different languages, none of which can be exploited without access to their source code, hence whitebox testing. The box also has a secondary theme, which I'll keep for when it's released.

As you go through it, sourceCode gets gradually more difficult. It does not focus on enumeration much, but on source code review instead. So, you always know what your next step is, and know what you must learn to exploit the current objective.

I even went ahead and included OSCE material, such that it is an excellent learning experience for both certificates, and can test your readiness for both.

I ranked it as Insane, which is appropriate once you complete the entire box. Still, I hope everyone will find something useful, even if they do not finish the entire box.

This was an excellent learning experience for me, as well, since I had to write from scratch scripts in 6 different languages, and make them in a way that they all interact together. I also had to make each of them vulnerable in a unique way, so I had to deeply understand each vulnerability and its whitebox testing technique, which turned out to be really useful for OSWE.

I submitted the box around 4 months ago, and I'm hoping it gets reviewed and approved soon. Shout out to @egotisticalSW for the great work he's been doing on reviewing box submissions.

I hope that sourceCode would be a great learning experience for all those considering taking OSWE or OSCE, and an excellent way to test your whitebox testing techniques before enrolling to OSWE.



AWAE Course/Lab

Before going through my Course/Exam review, I have to mention that I’m very restricted in what I’m allowed to say, so I will only mention in detail what is publicly announced by OffSec.

In general, I really enjoyed the Advanced Web Attacks and Exploitation (AWAE) course, and was learning new techniques at every module. When compared to OSCP, in my opinion, the AWAE course was miles better and much more enjoyable than PWK. This is not to say that PWK isn’t good, but rather because AWAE was so excellent and up-to-date.

I booked a couple of months lab time for $1600, and I think that was an overkill. The AWAE lab has 5 machines only for the course's 6 modules, and you should be easily able to complete all machines within just 2 weeks.

However, this will only be the case if you already finished the practice material I mentioned above, and had good whitebox testing skills. Otherwise, it might take you much more lab time to finish all machines and fully understand all modules, as they are quite advanced and complicated.

There are some areas in which AWAE can improve. First, AWAE does not provide enough vulnerability discovery techniques, and sometimes assumes the public knowledge of the vulnerability, while in real life, you must know techniques with which you can identify such vulnerabilities. Also, it would be better to teach a mixture of blackbox/whitebox discovery techniques, to make it easier to spot a vulnerability.

Another area in which AWAE can improve is huge code-base review techniques. If you have huge applications, without such techniques, none of the taught material would be helpful, so I think this is very critical.

Finally, AWAE would use a bit more extra-miles, as some vulnerabilities did not have extra practice material in the labs. It would also be good if such extra-miles covered the same vulnerability but in a different language, as what they did for deserialization, in which the course taught .Net deserializaiton, but there was an extra mile for a one in Java.

Once I finished all machines, I booked my exam “discussed later”, and created an exam preparation plan based on what I learned in the AWAE labs “discussed next”. Since I already had more than a month remaining in AWAE labs, I utilized the labs for my exam preparation, and completed all extra miles during that time, which I strongly recommend.



OSWE Exam Preparation

Once I finished my AWAE lab machines, and finished some extra miles, I wanted to use the time I had left by testing myself in each of the course modules.

My main plan was to find public exploits in each vulnerability type taught in AWAE, and then attempt to discover the vulnerability and write the exploit without reading the public exploit. However, this turned out to be difficult to arrange, since I had to go through so many vulnerabilities, and by the time I identified that the vulnerability suited the course, I already knew its attack vector, so it was no longer valid.

So, I created the following exam preparation plan for each course module. I included all AWAE extra-miles in the plan, and some others were based on HTB boxes, where I did not use the public exploit, but wrote it myself. You will need HTB VIP membership to access retired boxes, but a month in HTB “£10” is much cheaper than a month of AWAE "$400+".

Shout out to @ippsec for his great tool "http://ippsec.rocks/", which was quite handy in searching for topics for exam preparation.



Exam Preparation Plan

  • .NET deserialization:

    • DNN Extra-mile “AWAE labs”
    • Never used in HTB
  • Java deserialization:

    • ManageEngine Extra-mile “AWAE labs”
    • Arkham “HTB”
  • PHP Type Juggling:

    • ATutor Extra-mile “AWAE labs”
    • Falafel “HTB”
  • Advanced Authentication bypass:

    • ATutor Extra-mile “AWAE labs”
    • Didn’t find any in HTB
  • CSRF to admin API execution:

    • Atmail Extra-mile “AWAE labs”
    • Didn’t find any in HTB
  • Authenticated API to RCE:

    • Atmail Extra-mile “AWAE labs”
    • Zipper “HTB”
    • HackBack “HTB”
  • NodeJS Command injection:

    • Bassmaster Safe-Eval Extra-mile “AWAE labs”
    • Holiday “HTB”
  • Boolean SQLi to RCE:

    • Fighter “HTB”
    • Using boolean SQLi instead of union, without receiving rev shell, with access to source code, with MSSQL debugging
  • Time-Based SQLi data exfiltration:

    • Writeup “HTB”
    • Unattended “HTB”
    • Help “HTB”
    • Without SQLMap, without using/reading public exploit, using time-based SQLi instead of boolean
  • Advanced File upload RCE:

    • Ghoul “HTB“
    • Help “HTB“
    • Without using/reading public exploit



Python Exploit Development

During this time, among all of the above exercises, I also practiced python exploit development, which is a critical skill for the exam, without which you cannot pass. It doesn’t have to be python, but you have to be able to automate the exploitation process in a single exploit, and even chain multiple exploits together.

During my exam preparation, I wrote some fun exploits, such as:

  • Fully interactive webshell over python, bypasses firewall, WAF, and AV
  • Out of band SQL injection webshell, bypasses firewall, WAF, and AV
  • Blind Time-Based/Boolean SQL injection script, blindly leaks data from DB

I wanted to share all of them with you here for practicing, however, since these are exploitation scripts, I fear they might be misused, so I don’t feel comfortable sharing them. I can, however, share the Blind SQLi script, since anyone can simply use SQLMap.

This script can show you what kind of exploits you should be able to develop, and should also be a good exercise to rewrite. You practice it on the SQLi boxes mentioned above. It’s around a 100 lines long, can exploit both time-based and boolean SQLi, and can be adapted to any SQL injectable url.

You can get it at:
https://github.com/21y4d/blindSQLi



Exam Scheduling

As mentioned earlier, once I completed all of the machines, I went ahead to book my exam. However, to my surprise, the earliest exam date was 3 months away!

This was an issue most people faced with OSWE exam booking. I think the reason is that “if I’m not mistaken” OffSec only takes one OSWE student at a time for their exam, since OSWE is a proctored exam as well. The OSWE exam is a 48-hour long session, and if only one student takes the exam every two days, at most 15 students will do it a month. If you have 50 or so registered students, you are looking at 3 months waiting time!

Still, if you keep checking the exam booking page every day, you will definitely find a closer booking. Every week or so somebody tends to cancel their exam, so you may be able to book their exam date.

My suggestion is to book the exam as early as possible, and then when you’re almost done with your exam preparation and ready to take the exam, you can keep checking the exam booking page for any cancellations. You will almost certainly find an appointment within 2-3 weeks of looking, and perhaps even within a week, which is what happened in my case.

You must note that if you do this, you will probably get an exam date only 3 days away, which is quite nerve racking, suddenly knowing that you’ll do the dreaded 48-hour exam in just a few of days. This is because people are not allowed to cancel their exam within 48-hours from the exam, and so people tend to cancel 3 or more days before the exam, if they feel not ready.

I booked the exam 2 months ahead “I think it was due mid March 2020”, and kept checking for any cancellations. Then someone cancelled a month away, so I booked that. Since you are only given 3 booking attempts, I only had one booking change left. When I saw a cancellation 3 days from then, I booked it, and had to take, because I had no more change attempts left. In any case, I was ready for the exam, so I didn’t hesitate, but it was still nerve racking at the time.



OSWE Exam

Then we come to the dreaded rigorous exam itself, which it absolutely was!

I started my exam at 9 AM, and submitted my report a 8 AM three days later! This means that I worked for 72 hours straight, and only slept around 15 hours during that time. My total work time, without the rest, was 35 hours out of 48, add to that 12 hours for writing the report. I was extremely tired after the exam, and needed 5 days to recover my strength. When compared to my OSCP time, I got the passing points in around 6 hours, and finished all machines in around 10.

Eventually, I was able to finish all objectives, got a score of 100/100 "assumed", and even found a couple of extra vulnerabilities to achieve some of the objectives. But that did not come easily or quickly!

The exam objectives difficulty was on par with the course’s extra miles, and perhaps slightly more difficult. That is not to say it was not difficult, because the course and it’s extra miles were very challenging, especially when you don't know their answers.

However, the most challenging part is vulnerability discovery, which when the code-base is several hundreds of thousands of lines long, can take a very long time if you have not practiced code review very well. Adding to that, the many possible vulnerabilities you must test, and the amount of fatigue you will feel after putting so many hours in, and you will find yourself struggling to keep your focus.

As mentioned earlier, I cannot say much about the exam itself, but I want to leave some notes for those preparing for the OSWE exam, without spoiling anything. Such notes would have really helped me during my preparation, but like I said, not many OSWE reviews are out there.

I know that many people will ask how the exam is designed, but unfortunately I’m not sure I can say that here. Basically, the exam would have a small number of machines, each has one debug and one real version. You have to do your whitebox testing on the debug server, until you find the vulnerability, and then write your exploit. Then, you must test your exploits on the real target, and eventually gather the flags. There are a number of objectives for each target, and you will start on the real target as an unauthenticated user.

My main advise would be to do the following before taking the exam:

  1. Have a plan! My plan was divided by language, and then sub-divided by authenticated and unauthenticated exploits. I had a prioritized list of potential attack vectors for each language, based on the AWAE course, such that I will attempt the attacks in that order if I got a machine in that language. I cannot share it here, to avoid any spoilers.

  2. Practice huge code base review in all languages taught in AWAE, such that you feel comfortable understanding the functionalities of the web app, and able to match the vulnerable function to the web UI or API.

In general, if you are well prepared and have a good plan at hand, each objective can be done in around 4-6 hours, which leaves plenty of time for resting and taking breaks.

However, if you do not have a good strategy, or do not have a good way of quickly reviewing huge code-bases, you will find yourself needing way more than the 48 hours provided. I think that is the point of the 48-hour time limit, to ensure that one not only knows how to identify and exploit the vulnerabilities, but also have good techniques on how to do that efficiently.



AWAE Course strengths and weaknesses

In summary, I think AWAE/OSWE was an excellent learning experience, which greatly improved my web application pentesting skills, and greatly helped me in my daily work in identifying hard to find vulnerabilities. If anyone think they fit in the “who it’s for” criteria I mentioned above, I strongly suggest taking AWAE, as you will definitely benefit from it.

Course Strengths:

  1. Covers advanced real-world vulnerabilities
  2. Professional teaching quality
  3. Excellent lab material
  4. Good for bug hunting
  5. Good OffSec support

Course Weaknesses:

  1. Needs more vulnerability discovery techniques
  2. Needs blackbox/whitebox mixture for vulnerability discovery
  3. Doesn’t go deep on source code review techniques
  4. Extra-miles did not cover all modules
  5. Needs more extra-miles in another language



Future Plans

I’ve been working on OSWE for quite some time, and have some ideas for my next step. Eventually, I’m thinking about going deep into OS/Binary exploitation, with: PACES, GXPN, OSCE, and OSEE. If anyone took OSCE and any of the others "GXPN, OSEE, PACES", I would love to hear your feedback on how to prioritize them.

But for my next step, I think I may have to step back a bit and improve my blue team skills, so I’m considering either Security+ or CISSP. I don't want to go very deep in the blue side, since it's not my main focus. If anyone has done any of them, I would also really appreciate the feedback.

For now, though, I'll work on ranking up to Guru or higher, here on HTB :)

Thanks a lot for taking the time to read my “detailed” OSWE review, you are awesome :)

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Comments

  • Thanks for this excellent information! Nowhere near that level of knowledge yet but it was interesting to read nonetheless. One small note: you might want put a small spoiler warning before the "Exam Preparation Plan" since you're disclosing the attack vectors for some of the machines.

    GPLO

  • edited January 29
    > @GPLO said:
    > Thanks for this excellent information! Nowhere near that level of knowledge yet but it was interesting to read nonetheless. One small note: you might want put a small spoiler warning before the "Exam Preparation Plan" since you're disclosing the attack vectors for some of the machines.


    Thanks.. actually, unlike OSCP, in OSWE the course is a walkthrough of the solutions of each machine. So this is basically the course content.
  • Thank you for the detailed description and congratulations! How can I imagine a proctored exam in 48 hours? Do they follow my activity through a camera?

    bumika

  • @bumika said:
    Thank you for the detailed description and congratulations! How can I imagine a proctored exam in 48 hours? Do they follow my activity through a camera?

    It is very similar to OSCP, if you've taken that. Basically they watch you through webcam and view your screen, to ensure that you are the one doing the work, and not someone else. It goes on for the whole 48 hours.

  • I took OSCP in the pre-proctored era. I hope sleeping is not a subject of visibility. :)

    bumika

  • How long did you wait for results after the exam?

  • @bumika
    Well, you can take short/long breaks. I didn't go through proctoring since I covered it in my OSCP review.

    @martin59
    Around 5 days.

  • I have both Sec+ and CISSP. I would say skip the Sec+ and go for CISSP. CISSP has everything Sec+ has and more. CISSP is a beast in its own right, you have to learn the rules in ISC2's reality. Think like a high level boss in terms of how to defend everything, including stupid employees who write their password on a notepad and leave it on the subway. Even if you stay as a pen tester for life, CISSP helps you see the big picture so you never have to ask why am I doing this, or who does this affect?

  • @squirrelpizza said:
    I have both Sec+ and CISSP. I would say skip the Sec+ and go for CISSP. CISSP has everything Sec+ has and more. CISSP is a beast in its own right, you have to learn the rules in ISC2's reality. Think like a high level boss in terms of how to defend everything, including stupid employees who write their password on a notepad and leave it on the subway. Even if you stay as a pen tester for life, CISSP helps you see the big picture so you never have to ask why am I doing this, or who does this affect?

    Thanks for the feedback.. check dm..

  • Congrats! Great work.

    YanTayga
    OSCP | OSWP

  • Congrats! I'm going to be taking this one in a couple of weeks.

    Hack The Box

  • First of all congratulations!

    As a fellow OSWE holder I disagree with your assessment that the course doesn't cover vulnerability discovery enough, I actually found it was quite good.

    They give you all the tools needed to find vulnerabilities and the extra miles are really good at making you go through things and create your own methodology for vulnerability discovery.

    I also don't think the course should dive into blackbox testing, it's meant to be a whitebox testing course.

    I do agree that the course could use more extra miles and a tweak to a certain one...

    More languages is probably not needed since it covers the more common languages for web development, but more challenges would be nice.

    Just my opinions to offer some counter points :smiley:

    Hope to have a go at your box when it's out!!!

    blobbo

  • At least there is no XXE now (I guess I've seen it in previous AWAE public pdfs)

    YanTayga
    OSCP | OSWP

  • > @s0j0hn said:
    > Some boxes to practice with
    > https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1dwSMIAPIam0PuRBkCiDI88pU3yzrqqHkDtBngUHNCw8/htmlview#gid=665299979

    These boxes are for OSCP, not OSWE.
    You may mention them in my OSCP review.
  • Type your comment> @21y4d said:

    These boxes are for OSCP, not OSWE.
    You may mention them in my OSCP review.

    There is a tab for OSWE at the top

  • > @s0j0hn said:
    > Type your comment> @21y4d said:
    >
    > (Quote)
    > There is a tab for OSWE at the top

    Oh, I see.. Yeah, some of them are the same boxes mentioned above.

    I must mention that they contain parts that might be useful for OSWE, but unfortunately I couldn't find any with whitebox testing vectors.

    Hopefully sourceCode will be dedicated for this area, once it goes live.

    Thanks for sharing
  • Thanks for this detailed review. I am rather interested in this exam, since it would be a good fit for my day job as a developer. Do you think/know if OSCP is required for this exam?

  • @dnperfors said:
    Thanks for this detailed review. I am rather interested in this exam, since it would be a good fit for my day job as a developer. Do you think/know if OSCP is required for this exam?

    You can definitely go directly to OSWE, since there are no prerequisite to this course. I think it would also be good for you, since OSWE is also aimed towards developers.

    However, I must note that OSWE is an advanced course, so you must have good knowledge in web exploitation. If you do take and pass OSCP, and then complete the areas I mentioned in the study plan above, then you are good to go.

  • Thanks, I already planned to look at several boxes, including the ones mentioned in the link. After studying those, I can always decide whether or not I am confident enough to start...
  • If anyone took OSCE with any of "GXPN, OSEE, PACES", I would love to hear your feedback on how to prioritize them, and which ones aren't necessary.
  • Thank you so much for the detailed review, it’s probably the best one for the OSWE so far.

    But I still have some questions, as you mentioned before that you took some courses in web development, and you did not go very deep in each, but after reading the whole review, it gives the implication that you have to be an expert in the mentioned languages, or at least called a developer in that certain language, that you can read and write anything. Is this true?
    And can you please recommend any courses (URL’s) that helped you in learning those languages?

  • > @ASD0 said:
    > Thank you so much for the detailed review, it’s probably the best one for the OSWE so far.
    >
    > But I still have some questions, as you mentioned before that you took some courses in web development, and you did not go very deep in each, but after reading the whole review, it gives the implication that you have to be an expert in the mentioned languages, or at least called a developer in that certain language, that you can read and write anything. Is this true?
    > And can you please recommend any courses (URL’s) that helped you in learning those languages?


    What I meant is that you wouldn't have to become and expert in each language, but you have to be able to read it's code, understand it's web functionality, and be able to write some code in it, in case you have to modify any of the code. So you should be able to develop things in it, but by no means do you have to become an expert developer in each.

    Other than the courses i mentioned above, you can either search YouTube for introductory courses, or you can take an web development course in that language from udemy.
  • For those interested, I have just done Smasher2, and I think the user part is an excellent example and practice for the OSWE exam.
  • Type your comment> @s0j0hn said:

    Type your comment> @21y4d said:

    These boxes are for OSCP, not OSWE.
    You may mention them in my OSCP review.

    There is a tab for OSWE at the top

    Take a look at this on:
    https://klezvirus.github.io/

    @21y4d May I ask your thoughts about it?

  • @klezNG said:
    Type your comment> @s0j0hn said:

    Type your comment> @21y4d said:

    These boxes are for OSCP, not OSWE.
    You may mention them in my OSCP review.

    There is a tab for OSWE at the top

    Take a look at this on:
    https://klezvirus.github.io/

    @21y4d May I ask your thoughts about it?

    Thanks for sharing this.
    As you mentioned, not many boxes are good for white-box testing and preparing for OSWE and OSCE. Even the practice material I mentioned above is only for practicing for a certain type of vulnerability after you fully owned the box and have access to their source code.

    This is why I hope sourceCode will be a unique box and a good addition to HTB, whenever it gets released.

  • @21y4d Thanks for the excellent review.

    Could you provide some resources (books, CTFs?) for practicing code review of large code base? How one should approach the code review and what should be the methodology.

    roguesecurity

  • > @roguesecurity said:
    > @21y4d Thanks for the excellent review.
    >
    > Could you provide some resources (books, CTFs?) for practicing code review of large code base? How one should approach the code review and what should be the methodology.

    Honestly, this was one of the difficult parts of OSWE, and eventually I had to go through real web apps in each language, and find my way around each language, and how to quickly identify each type of vulnberabilities, both in linux and windows.

    There's one reference that might be good, chapter 19 in the Web Application Hacker's Handbook. But I think you must practice this for each language, and find your way around it.

    I'm sure more experienced developers in each language would have much more efficient ways of going through the code, but I didn't find anything useful, so I had to come up with my own way.
  • For those interested, above I mentioned that HTB has not practice for .net deserialization.
    The recently retired "json" box has one, though very basic, but is a good practice nonetheless.
  • edited February 20

    Update 3:
    Another good command injection practice is machine "Obscurity".
    Though it is a basic injection, it is a good exercise to start with.

    All updates to OSWE study guide:
    -Auth bypass, on box "Smasher2"
    -.net deserialization, on box "Json"
    -command injection, on box "Obscurity"

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